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Boca Raton Museum of Art
501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, FL 33432
In Mizner Park
T: 561.392.2500 F: 561.391.6410
Email: info@bocamuseum.org

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Hours:
Tues, Wed & Fri
Thurs
Saturday & Sunday
Mondays & holidays


10AM - 5PM
10AM - 8PM
NOON - 5PM
CLOSED

Admission:
Members
Children(12 & under)
Adults
Seniors(65 +)
Students(with ID)

1st SUNDAY of each month


FREE
FREE
$12
$10
FREE

FREE 

   

Upcoming Exhibitions

April 21 - July 12, 2015
Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power

Helena Rubinstein (1872-1965) was born in Poland and immigrated – via Australia and Paris – to New York at the beginning of World War I. She then opened her first U.S. salon featuring her face cream made from lanolin and revolutionized the cosmetics industry. She sold her corporation to Lehman Brothers in 1928 but repurchased the stock and went on to open her acclaimed spa on Fifth Avenue along with salons across the country, and the manufacturing arm.

A collector of people and art, she commissioned Salvador Dalí to design packaging for her compacts and to paint her portrait. He was not the only one to paint Ms. Rubinstein, and this show includes portraits by Picasso, Man Ray, and Warhol.

Included are paintings by Miró and Chagall, and selections from her fine jewelry and couture clothing collections. Photographs of her residences in New York, Paris, and London, and her spas and salons will bring to the fore Ms. Rubinstein as a savvy businessperson and cultural icon.

Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power is organized by the Jewish Museum, New York. 

The exhibition is made possible by The Jerome L. Greene Foundation.

Roberto Montenegro, Helena Rubinstein in a Mexican Silver Necklace, 1941. Oil on canvas, 31 ½ x 27 12/16 in. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

April 21 - August 23, 2015
Shannon Plumb: What A Character

Shannon Plumb’s solo exhibition of short videos and Super-8 films is inspired by the spirit of slapstick comedy and the physical humor of iconic silent screen legends such as Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Plumb creates and plays a diverse cast of characters such as Olympic athletes, cowboys, and advertising announcers, employing a low-fi asthetic with long takes and hand-made props and costumes.

Shannon Plumb, Rattles and Cherries [from the series Black and White], 2010. Super-8 film, 4:18 min..

April 21 - June 14, 2015
Hammock Pointe Partnership: Express Yourself
Writing about art can be as fun as making it. The Museum's partnership with Hammock Pointe Elementary takes a new twist with a new, fully integrated curriculum-based project for third graders centered on ekphrasis, a technique of writing vivid descriptions of art. On display is the students' portraits and written work.

July 25 - August 23, 2015
Brenda Hope Zappitell, A Journey of Gestures

In continuing the tradition of the All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition and showcasing artists living and working in Florida, the Boca Raton Museum of Art is proud to present a selection of paintings by Brenda Hope Zappitell.

Zappitell credits the Boca Raton Museum Art School as an indispensable training ground during her early years, which helped catapult her to national recognition that she enjoys today. Those early years included representational work and collage. However, she soon found imagery to be a crutch and was moved to employ the gestural freedom of Abstract Expressionism.

“My paintings emerge from the emotion I feel in the moment my brush touches a blank surface," said Zappitell. "I am a very physical and spontaneous painter. Moving back and forth with decisive brush strokes and dynamic gestures, I work rapidly to capture that ephemeral feeling in tangible form.” The results are large panel compositions with layers of vigorous marks that are innumerable and subtle.

In addition to painting, Zappitell is an accomplished writer and instructor, regularly contributing to Professional Artist Magazine and holding private workshops in Florida and New Mexico.

Brenda Hope Zappitell (born 1964), Family, 2015. Acrylic, flashe and cold wax on panel. 50 x 50 in. Courtesy of the artist.

 

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What is a CVV Code?

CVV2 is a security measure for credit cards. Since a CVV2 number is listed on your credit card, but is not stored anywhere, the only way to know the correct CVV2 number for your credit card is to physically have possession of the card itself. All VISA, Discover, MasterCard and American Express cards made in America in the past 5 years or so have a CVV2 number. However Diners Club does not use a security code.

How to find your CVV2 number:
On a VISA, Discover or MasterCard, please turn your card over and look in the signature strip. You will find (either the entire 16-digit string of your card number, OR just the last 4 digits), followed by a space, followed by a 3-digit number. That 3-digit number is your CVV2 number.(See below)

VISA, Discover & MasterCard


On American Express Cards, the CVV2 number is a 4-digit number that appears above the end of your card number. (See below)