Transitions: Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini

Jul 27 - Sept 22, 2013
Boca Raton Museum of Art

The transitory nature of dreams and memory are the subjects of this two-person exhibition of artists, Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini. Despite their different backgrounds and artistic mediums, both artists share an exploration of subconscious thought, time, and space.

Matthews re-interprets the stark black and grey silhouettes of New York City into a soft creamy white. Skyscrapers, cars, bridges, and water towers float, street grids meander, and pigeons are transformed into doves. Author Salman Rushdie wrote of his works, “the white paintings…are lucid affectionate dreams of New York, like an all-white Oz with a white brick road (Broadway) snaking through a white metropolis that might, if you looked at it through green glasses, look almost like an emerald city.”

Similarly, Rossini’s subtly evocative photographs could be dreams rather than representations of the sky, sea and land he shoots. Instead of using his camera to freeze time like most photographers, he works like a painter to capture momentary impressions. His oversized prints with their patterns, texture, muted palette, and delicate tonal transitions seem more like canvases than images trapped by a lens. Rossini aims to catch the barely discernible memory of the moment between past and present. He achieves this goal by layering sequential images over abstract fields and distorting and compressing space to create beautiful and mysterious images.

Transitions: Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini comes directly from its presentation as a collateral event at the 55th Venice Biennale, curated by Natalie Clifford. The accompanying catalog includes essays by Clifford, Salman Rushdie, Francesco Clemente, and Boca Museum curator, Kathleen Goncharov. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with Space SBH Contemporary Art Gallery

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Transitions: Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini

Victor Matthews (American, born 1963) Frozen City IV, 2013, wood, canvas, sneaker, paint, and cardboard, 29 x 19 x 7 inches. Courtesy of the Artist