Five Videos

Nov. 9, 2014-Jan. 11, 2015
Boca Raton Museum of Art

This international assemblage of video installations features artists from Norway, South Africa, Japan, and the United States. The five videos included feature a theme of music, complimented by scheduled piano concerts in the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s galleries. Individually, the works explore themes such as aging, solitude, loneliness, and the fragility of nature.

Forever (and again)
Shizuka Yokomizo’s Forever (and again) juxtaposes four elderly women playing the same Chopin waltz (Op. 69, #2) on the piano with stationary video of their domestic environments.

It Takes Two to Tango
The music in Trine Lise Nedraas’ It Takes Two to Tango is imaginary. Bill, an 80-year-old regular dancer at the Rivoli Ballroom in London welcomes the viewer to join him in a dance, to music only he can hear.

Fade to White
Janet Biggs’ Fade to White features the Baroque aria Amarilli Mia Bella by Giulio Caccini. Countertenor John Kelly sings, interspersed with a schooner trip to the Artic taken by Biggs. His mournful voice parallels the vanishing polar landscape.

Pictures Reframed
Robin Rhode and virtuoso pianist Leif Ove Andsnes collaborated on a reinvention of the romantic 1874 masterpiece, Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky. Rhode is known for politically-charged street art and stop-motion videos of people interacting with drawings of everyday objects.

Cat Video
Cory Arcangel’s deceptively simple Cat Video is a recreation of Arnold Schoenberg’s seminal 1909 Drei Klavierstücke, considered to be one of the first atonal piano compositions. Using software in a complex and tedious process, Arcangel has recreated Schoenberg’s piano piece through now-ubiquitous.

Share

Five Videos

Shizuka Yokomizo (Japanese, born 1966), Forever (and Again) [film still], 2003, two channel video projection, dimensions variable

Five Videos

Trine Lise Nedrass (Norwegian, born 1972), It Takes Two to Tango [film still], 2002, single channel video projection, 3:40 video looped, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Stephan Stoyanov Gallery, New York