Boca Raton Museum of Art
501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, FL 33432
In Mizner Park
T: 561.392.2500 F: 561.391.6410


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10AM - 5PM
10AM - 8PM

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Current Exhibitions

October 29 - December 13, 2015
Boca Raton Museum Artists' Guild 65th Anniversary Exhibition

One of South Florida's most vibrant artists groups, the Boca Raton Museum Artists' Guild, presents its fall 2015 juried exhibition with works in an array of mediums, each created by local artists.

November 3, 2015 - February 14, 2016
Dames: Portraits by Norman Sunshine

The human figure has captivated Norman Sunshine for much of his artistic career. In decades past he painted grand canvases of quiet moments between multiple figures, capturing the great and small episodes of life.

During a period of convalescence when he could not paint as he once was able to do, Sunshine delved into the digital world of art making and searched for subjects of style and substance. In doing so he was taken with notable women; their poise, their composure, and their self-assurance. Among those who have posed for him are art patron Agnes Gund, philanthropist Nancy Kissinger, and Anne Sutherland Fuchs, former publisher of Vogue, Woman’s Day, and Elle.

Dames: Portraits by Norman Sunshine is organized by the Boca Raton Museum of Art and curated by Marisa J. Pascucci. The exhibition is generously underwritten by Dr. Nicole Edeiken and Beatrice Cummings Mayer with additional support provided by the Friends Auxiliary.

Norman Sunshine's portrait of Martha Stewart
Norman Sunshine, Martha. Giclée print on rag paper, 57 x 42 in. Courtesy of the artist.

September 11, 2015 - January 10, 2016
Memories of the Shtetl

In the late 1930s, Samuel Rothbort (1882 – 1971) began creating “memory paintings” of his native Walkovisk, a small village in Czarist Russia. Eventually numbering over five hundred, Rothbort’s paintings have become lauded as a cultural resource depicting life in a predominantly Jewish village, commonly known as a Shtetl. Their nostalgic sense of wonder and joyous colors have challenged many observers’ notions of prewar Eastern European Jewish life.

Memories of the Shtetl features a selection of oil and watercolor paintings by Rothbort. Artistically gifted and largely self-taught, Rothbort’s work depicts a reverence for nature and everyday life in a Shtetle. His memory paintings were the subject of a 1961 documentary film “The Ghetto Pillow” (later renamed “Memories of the Shtetle”) by Harriet Semegram and provided inspiration for Jerome Robbins’ staging of the 1964 musical “Fiddler on the Roof.”

Samuel Rothbort, Rye Wagon Going Through Town, 1956. Watercolor on paper, 11 x 14 inches.

September 11, 2015 - January 10, 2016
Veil of Memory, Prologue: The Last Supper

On March 31, 1492, an edict issued by the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon, ordered the expulsion of Jews from their kingdom. Given only three months to flee the country, convert to Catholicism, or be executed without trial, some 200,000 people were abruptly exiled from their homeland. Those who chose to leave were forbidden to carry gold, silver, or coined money out of the kingdom.

Veil of Memory. Prologue: The Last Supper by Terry Berkowitz depicts a forgotten moment as the Jews of Spain paused for a final meal, at the threshold of the unknown, just a few hours before crowding into the tiny 15th century ships that would take them away. Visitors are invited to sit at a wooden table in the shape of a crucifix. Atop the table sit empty bowls, spoons, and glasses partially filled with water. Video projections on nearby walls reveal blue-hued shapes of people lined up to march on their journey with portions of the edict of expulsion layered under image. In the center of the table is a display of the sea in constant motion with sounds of crashing waves, Catalan liturgical music, and the murmurs of people too nervous or afraid to speak aloud.


September 11, 2015 - January 10, 2016
Rosie Won the War

Rosie Won the War by Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock recalls the seminal moment in the history of the 20th century. With America’s engagement in World War II, working women began to dominate the public image at home. Inspired by Norman Rockwell’s iconic picture, Rosie the Riveter, Stih and Schnock’s series is a homage to women on the home front working “men’s jobs” in manufacturing plants while men were fighting the enemy in battlefields abroad.

Rosie Won the War depicts powerful women in life-size portraits wearing working gear. Tools in hand define their current occupation. The images capture this particular moment in history seen through the female eye, set in relation to working women today.

The images depict women positioned provocatively like the “Big Nudes” of Helmut Newton, but with very different expression and self-definition. They stand on maps from the past, recalling the topography of World Word II and forming a link between past and present. The portrait series includes paintings based on digital collages of staged photography, mapping structures, drawings, and text.

Complementary to the photo series is the video Counter Attack. Calling upon the image of Rosie the Riveter with one foot on Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf, the video shows women’s feet stepping on the Nazi leader’s manifesto with spikes on their feet until it is tattered, and then completely destroyed.

Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, Rosie Won the War, 2015.

September 11, 2015 - January 10, 2016
The Neighbor Next Door

The Neighbor Next Door by Shimon Attie presents a visceral interpretation of the experiences of those driven into hiding by the Nazi regime as was the family of Anne Frank in Amsterdam. Attie has created immersive multimedia art that reflects on the relationship between place, memory, and identity. The installation is Attie’s re-envisioning of a site-specific work he first presented in Amsterdam in 1995 where he projected films taken in secret by people forced into seclusion by the Nazi occupation onto the street every night for two weeks.

April 21, 2015 - January 10, 2016
Izhar Patkin: You Tell Us What to Do

Israeli-born, New York based artist Izhar Patkin fills the Museum's gallery space with spectacular mural-size paintings on tulle fabric.

Grand, labyrinthine, yet surprisingly intimate the space is resplendent with personal narrative, political metaphor, and myth emphasizing memory, loss, love, and exile.

Curated by Kathleen Goncharov, Boca Raton Museum of Art.

Izhar Patkin (Israeli, born 1955), You Tell Us What to Do [detail], 2010, ink on pleated tulle curtains, 14 x 22 x 28 feet

November 1, 2014 - Ongoing
A New Path: Two Installations in the Colonnade

This Color is Great by Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock

Stih & Schnock are Berlin-based visual artists who introduce art in public spaces thereby affecting everyday life.

In this work, the artists have used the common expression of a woman’s lips and what she might be saying in contrast to what she is actually thinking. This is the first in a series of artist-commissioned banners along the Amphitheater colonnade that dramatically changes a familiar path as the visitor approaches the Museum.

The Pursuit of Happiness by Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt

Behar and Marquardt, who established R&R Studios in Miami, have a multidisciplinary architectural practice weaving together visual arts, exhibition design, architecture, and urban design. They have been commissioned to rethink the entry into the Museum along the colonnade, providing a new pathway that is at once intimate and monumental. Their installation incorporates multi-colored ribbons in the interior gallery windows, draping the space making it both public and private by way of the sensual sway of vivid colors.

As part of this project, R&R Studios has redesigned the Museum Store, which stands as the “cornerstone” of the Museum, the first space the visitor sees upon entering the building where the colonnade and the courtyard intersect. The Store reopened to the public on November 1, 2014. The Store features one of a kind and limited edition works for sale by local, national, and international artists and artisans along with exhibition-specific merchandise, trunk shows, and author events.

Making Connections: Selections from the Boca Museum and Private Collections

The Boca Museum of Art’s internationally recognized (and ever-growing) Permanent Collection includes over 5,000 works of art and is featured throughout the building and sculpture garden.

With strong holdings in late 19th and 20th century European and American prints, drawings, painting, sculpture, and photography, the Museum strives to present key examples of Modernism as well as non-western art and artifacts in our African and Pre-Columbian collections.

Santuario de Chimayo
Boca Museum second floor galleries
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